The Misinformation Age: How False Beliefs Spread

The Misinformation Age: How False Beliefs Spread

The social dynamics of ?alternative facts?: why what you believe depends on who you know Why should we care about having true beliefs? And why do demonstrably false beliefs persist and spread despite bad, even fatal, consequences for the people who hold them? Philosophers of science Cailin O?Connor and James Weatherall argue that social factors, rather than individual psycho The social dynamics of ?alternative facts?: why what you believe depends on who you know Why should ...

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Title:The Misinformation Age: How False Beliefs Spread
Author:Cailin O'Connor
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:0300234015
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:280 pages pages

The Misinformation Age: How False Beliefs Spread Reviews

  • Kressel Housman
    May 06, 2019
    The authors of this book are philosophers of science, which means they specialize in questions of how we know what we know. Their bias, if you can call it that, is for the scientific method. The thesis of the book, however, is that since people don?t form their opinions based on the ...
  • Don
    May 30, 2019
    The catchy title of the book is supposed to get at the bane of modern times, "fake news," but at its core this book is a philosophy book. It examines, discusses, analyzes our epistemology - how we come to know things - and then applies that to modern situations where the truth of certa...
  • Todd
    Jan 01, 2019
    By modeling how misinformation can intentionally and innocently weave its way through the networks of scientists, O'Connor and Weatherall offer a model for the spread of "fake news" among the general population. There's plenty of solid philosophy and sociology of science here supported...
  • Brian
    Feb 07, 2019
    VERY "scholarly" and scientific - which is good, but didn't make for an exactly riveting read. Some very important points, but not much I didn't already realize. Ms. O'Connor gave a very good interview on the "Hidden Brain" podcast - search that out instead. ...
  • Jamie Showrank
    Feb 04, 2019
    Kicks off with the vegetable lamb! Compelling examples describing how beliefs are shaped through trusted and propaganda systems. Incredibly informative and helpful for #behavioral #design. Will read again! ...
  • Kbeckermann
    Aug 05, 2019
    What I particularly appreciated was how they illustrated the different ways that media, scientists and bad actors influence public policy. This is very readable and if you're new to this topic, definitely worth reading; for me, there wasn't a lot of new information. It is a useful and ...
  • Leif
    Mar 04, 2019
    Jeez. They really, really want to be good at this, and they are! After the initial joy of an old-fashioned round of "everyone is stupid and look how long people believed in this crazy vegetable lamb", unfortunately, Misinformation Age finds itself with more misses than hits, at least f...
  • Tyler Critchfield
    Jun 08, 2019
    Really interesting read - not meant to entertain and was a little heavy on philosophy for my liking, but I liked their straightforwardness. It's given me a lot to think about. I think the spread of misinformation and what we can do to help prevent it, will only be a larger and larger i...
  • C
    Jul 25, 2019
    This book takes you step by step on how misinformation spreads. ...
  • jeffrey
    Jun 19, 2019
    Generally well-written history (and, perhaps, guide) of how misinformation is spread, either intentionally or inadvertently by experts or by "propagandists". The text is a bit dense in parts, but not enough to interfere with the general message. The last section of the book discussing ...
  • Emma Lake
    May 13, 2019
    ...
  • Oliver Bogler
    Mar 25, 2019
    With a strong emphasis on science, it explores and explains how information travels through social networks, and what influences its movement. It shows how such networks can fail to spread the best information spontaneously, or worse under the influence of individuals trying to spread ...
  • Sara Goldenberg
    Jun 10, 2019
    It was a little beyond me. ...
  • Mills College Library
    Aug 09, 2019
    153.74 O183 2019 ...
  • Brian
    Feb 28, 2019
    Extremely interesting. O'Connor and Weatherall examine the social effects contributing to the spread of false beliefs. If you're like me, you'll go in thinking you already know how fake news spreads. But by the time you're done, you'll realize things are way, way worse than you even im...
  • Elisa Sutherland
    Feb 27, 2019
    ...
  • Stephen
    Jun 07, 2019
    An overall okay work with some interesting anecdotes and useful explanations of different social contexts that can create misinformation. The authors? models on the circulation of (mis)information are worth reading about. Not all misinformation is passed around the same way, nor ...
  • Jerry Wall
    Mar 15, 2019
    Subtitled how false beliefs spread. Basically, we believe things that suit our mindset. There could be little doubt that human activity was capable of altering our environment at a massive scale, and so quickly that within decades we had substantially eroded our natural protection ag...
  • Sulpicia Cresswell
    Dec 30, 2018
    A really excellent and readable book! Professors O'Connor and Weatherall write in a clear and straightforward manner that should be generally accessible. The book is divided into four chapters each of which employ two to three case studies which talk about one aspect of the spread of f...
  • Liz L
    Mar 20, 2019
    Most of this book was interesting and helpful, but I was disappointed with the final chapter. I read this for a book club we have going in my department, and I'm bummed because we're not going to get a chance to talk about the interesting stuff in the rest of the book because we'll ...
  • Enuntiatio
    Mar 16, 2019
    Overall, the Misinformation Age: How False Beliefs Spread was a disappointment. I had hopped for a much more dispassionate explanation of how information spreads and how people come to believe empirically falsifiable beliefs. There is some of that and some interesting network modeling....
  • Riley Haas
    Mar 09, 2019
    This is a compelling examination of mathematical models about the way beliefs spread through human social networks. The authors, two logicians, give us an overview of mathematical modelling of the methods by which beliefs spread within scientific social networks. I read a lot of psyc...
  • Leanne Ellis
    Mar 04, 2019
    Excellent! ...
  • Mr. Book
    Feb 23, 2019
    ...
  • Dave Cass
    Jul 11, 2019
    This is a dry, but enjoyable read for those with a basic scientific and technical literacy. The authors follow a relatively consistent and familiar format that allows the reader to move through relatively easy: anecdote, explanation of concept, visual model, further considerations. Thi...
  • Mark Ainsworth
    Aug 14, 2019
    Quick read that's worth it Not too much that a surprise here but the organization and tools to think about how info spreads is outstanding. ...
  • MedMax
    Jul 10, 2019
    Lots of stuff about social networks and how the influence opinions. Few case studies about scientific discoveries but mostly about how politicians and journalists respond to scientific findinds. Not about science or scientific methods. Everything is political blabla No! Politics ...
  • Steven Cunningham
    Aug 18, 2019
    Just finished this book, The Misinformation Age: How False Beliefs Spread, by Cailin O'Connor and James Owen Weatherall. The Vegetable Lamb of Tartary, a gourd-like fruit with an actual, tiny flesh-and-blood lamb inside, was believed by leading scholars in the 14th century to actual...
  • C.E. Murray
    Jun 15, 2019
    Very interesting ideas are presented. A lot of it can be summed up by the Upton Sinclair quote "It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his job depends on not understanding it", but that does not do it justice. A little less than half of the book is the endnotes and ...
  • David Allen
    Jun 10, 2019
    see my review at: http://davidmallenmd.blogspot.com/201... ...