The Way of Herodotus: Travels With the Man Who Invented History

The Way of Herodotus: Travels With the Man Who Invented History

During the classical age of Greece, Herodotus wrote the first history text. But what he created was much more than this. Informed by his own travels, his historical work digresses more than it chronicles, with tales of the lands and peoples he visited. As Michael Ondaatje once famously suggested, ?What you find in him are the cul-de-sacs within the sweep of history.? In Th During the classical age of Greece, Herodotus wrote the first history text. But what he created was much more than th...

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Title:The Way of Herodotus: Travels With the Man Who Invented History
Author:Justin Marozzi
Rating:
Genres:History
ISBN:The Man Who Invented History: Travels With Herodotus
ISBN
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:348 pages pages

The Way of Herodotus: Travels With the Man Who Invented History Reviews

  • Scott
    Jul 02, 2018
    A trip around the Med, visiting the places Herodotus went is a dream trip for me, hence my interest in this book. Marozzi does just that, and throws in a visit with Patrick Leigh Fermor, dean of modern travel writing. ...
  • Pat
    Aug 30, 2009
    I was expecting something different from this book - something more on the lines of Scott Huler's No Man's Lands, where he traced the locations in the Odyssey around the current-day Mediterranean. Marozzi uses Herodotus as a starting point for trips to places included in Herodotus' wor...
  • Angel
    Aug 20, 2010
    The premise behind this book seemed pretty good at the time: writer tracing the steps of Herodotus. I thought it could not fail. However, the text is extremely dry, full of a lot of digressions (and I don't mean that in a good way), and overall, the book failed to hold my interest afte...
  • John
    Jan 17, 2011
    I read this as a modern-day "historical footsteps" adventure, which didn't work out as well as I'd hoped; the book is loaded with references to and examples of Herodotus' writings, which didn't hold my interest. I'd certainly recommend the book for those interested in The Classical Wor...
  • Janis
    Aug 17, 2012
    I have the feeling that both Herodotus and author Marozzi would make excellent traveling companions ? knowledgeable, tolerant, and highly curious. I enjoyed retracing Herodotus? journeys, learned quite a lot about past and present-day issues and cultures, and was sorry when this bo...
  • Colleen Clark
    Sep 19, 2011
    I bought this book 4 years ago and took it with me on an extended trip to Turkey this spring. I enjoyed reading it on the road, although I was not near most of the places Marozzi traveled to with Herodotus. He starts first in Cambridge, England with a discursive narrative about his ow...
  • Simon
    Mar 14, 2011
    An interesting tour around the eastern Mediterranean by an historian retracing the steps of Herodotus. The author has a few annoying habits, including a rather old-fashioned attitude to women, who tend to be described and judged first and foremost in terms of their attractiveness reg...
  • Gwynneth
    Apr 01, 2009
    Trite statement: I liked this book. It's an offbeat approach to travel writing that also combines an educational bent with some terrific wordsmithing. However, if you don't have much of a classical background, you might want to consider passing on it. ...
  • Nathan
    Nov 12, 2009
    As a modern travelogue and observation of the various cultures Marozzi encounters on his journey, this is a light, entertaining read. Not so entertaining is Marozzi's handling of Herodotus himself. Admittedly working with a daunting dearth of information, Marozzi settles for making far...
  • Tammy
    Dec 28, 2010
    Herodotus is a person I have heard of before (?The Father of History?), but have never actually read his work. After enjoying ?The Way of Herodotus,? I feel as if I now know the man, Herodotus, and the highlights of his works. As author Justin Marozzi follows the path of Herodo...
  • Sarah
    Aug 14, 2009
    Just started this, I did a little Herodotus at school but he always struck me as being a bit, shall we say, fantastical, in his 'history', but to discover he was meticulous in his research and often right in his pronouncements on customs and origins of ancient cultures is very interest...
  • Dan
    Mar 30, 2009
    Chatty but erudite guide to the world of the ancient Greek historian, who remains surprisingly topical. Marozzi is a charming companion, never bogs down in too much detail while sharing his enthusiasms. ...
  • Lisa
    Feb 17, 2009
    Favorite book so far this year. Can't report more at the moment due to there is a cat sitting on my left arm, making computing difficult. ...
  • Nazila
    Jan 09, 2013
    It's neither my favorite nor what I expected. the only point I like is what author wrote about Herodotus as an anthropologist and I see his book is about the traditions and culture of people and nations not just about their wars and kings. ...
  • Tom
    Feb 17, 2009
    A great book! Chatty, informative, fun, and rewarding just like Herodotus. A friend in Grad School had the classic question for his Oral Comps for the PhD. Which do you prefer, Herodotus or Thucydides as a historian? He choose Herodotus, even though his adviser did not like it. Tim sti...
  • Lauren Albert
    Nov 02, 2017
    When I was a freshman, we all had to sign up for a course designed just for freshman. So, being in my classics stage, I signed up for a class on Herodotus. I didn't have a clue. There were (I think) only six people in the class which is the smallest class I've ever been in including gr...
  • Vera Marie
    Feb 04, 2011
    I enjoyed The Way of Herodotus, and thought it was a good introduction to Herodotus' Histories, since I have never read them in the entirety. The same book was issued in Britain as The Man Who Invented History: Travels With Herodotus. I liked [author Justin Marozzi]'s attempt to foll...
  • James
    Jul 20, 2011
    Not a great travel book, which is too bad because I was excited to read this one. While it's ostensibly about the author retracing Herodotus' journeys and visiting the places that he did, there's actually very little travel writing. Way too much of the book is just a rehash of The Hist...
  • Chris
    Jan 04, 2016
    I must admit that I found this book hard going and left it for a while to read a Philippa Gregory for light relief. It did make Herodotus seem an interesting man worth knowing more about and some of the anecdotes, particularly the ones taken from Herodotus's 'Histories' made a good rea...
  • False
    Jan 30, 2015
    The author follows in the footsteps of the Father of History: Herodotus. A wonderful read. I couldn't put it down and read it in one day. Time flew. A lovely chapter on Patrick Leigh Fermor. A great book for historians and for the lovers of classic Greek history. ...
  • Nathan
    Jan 25, 2011
    I got bored. I thought it would be more about history and less about modern travel -- my fault more than the author's. What is his fault, though, is how much this guy LOVES Herodotus. I came into the book liking him, too, and having had a rewarding experience reading The Histories, but...
  • Luciana Cavallaro
    Jul 29, 2014
    I picked up this book to read for research purposes as I had read Herodotus' Histories. This is a wonderful compendium to the Histories and pays due homage to the first travel and history writer. I am fan of Herodotus and thought the treatment by his predecessors and scholars was un...
  • Sherwin
    Sep 01, 2012
    A rousing tale of travelling alongside the man who invented history. Full its fair share of digressions and debauchery, Marozzi manages to emulate Herodotus in every way possible. You feel the emotional highs and lows of his journey through the Mediterranean; the spirit of Herodotus wa...
  • Lyn Elliott
    Jul 19, 2016
    I finished reading this not long after Ryszard Kapu?ci?ski?s older book with a very similar title (see my review here). Both are classified as travel writing, both connect places with episodes and ideas from the ancient Greek writer and traveler, Herodotus?. Both men are desc...
  • Steven Allen
    Jul 31, 2016
    I had a very hard time finishing this book. The topic is interesting but the author's writing is very dry with little to no humor. I did not care for the author's style of writing, but the locations were beautifully described and well researched. ...
  • joyce
    Sep 09, 2012
    This travelogue introduces the reader to both history and the recording of travels. Although there has been much discussion as to the veracity of Herodotus' writings, if you allow yourself to be drawn into the adventure, you will be inspired to continue to search history for other obse...
  • Susan
    Jan 13, 2016
    This book has very little to do with Herodotus and a lot about travel writing and whether history plus travel writing equals truth. Once I figured that out, the book was okay, although I found some of the author's rabbit trails more interesting than others. I particularly appreciated t...
  • Nathan Cain
    Feb 04, 2014
    The author looks at some of the themes of Herodotus through the modern day context in Egypt, Greece and Turkey. He travels to some of the key locations mentioned in the Histories meeting various characters that have their own take on Herodotus. This is an accessible and in some parts h...
  • Revanth Ukkalam
    May 11, 2018
    The very idea of walking the trail of Herodotus who has been considered, variously, both the Father of History and the Father of lies; is entertaining, fashionable, and exciting. Marozzi is able to exploit the benefits of that gist from the title onward. The book is equally exciting to...
  • Matthew Gilmore
    May 31, 2018
    Very uneven... Marozzi (consciously?) emulated Herodotus with a discursive, digressive style. ...